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It’s funny now when I think of my childhood home, how stylish my mum made it when I know we had very little money for splurges growing up.  Back when I was very young, she had a unique and eclectic style that I just never (and probably couldn’t) appreciate at the time.  I remember her telling me she got her impossibly grand Rococo french bed set (a queen-sized bed, a large dresser with mirror, a tallboy and chest of drawers) at an auction for less than $100.  Her dark wood antique Queen Anne style dining set (a large table, 6 chairs, large buffet-style hutch and a small console and a display cabinet) was purchased for even less from an older lady she befriended at work.  Oh yes, she was a bargain hunter for sure.  Perhaps my genetics have served me well.

I remember the sleek gold silk settee with dark wood accents that sat in our living room, a set of oversized oil paintings depicting bulls and matadors in mid-battle hung above it.  Our entrance way had the very same dark grey slate flooring I’m considering for my own kitchen along with a huge wrought iron chandelier.  These details are imprinted in my memory so apologies for not being able to share lots of images but trust me, the lady had taste way back when.  Once the late 80’s/early 90’s hit, I remember her getting rid of things she felt were dated and at the time, they probably were so I wouldn’t blame her for that.  Still, I can’t help feeling a bit sad that she let some truly beautiful pieces go in the name of ever-fickle interior fashion.

One thing I vividly remember is the red oriental rug in our dining room.  For the past 30mumble years, I would have never considered one in my own home.  To me, they signified a time long past and the dining room of a woman who is now well into her 60s and a childhood now lost in gold-tinged memories.

The Oriental rug. That’s me with my two brothers. 
Should I have warned this post  may not be suitable for work?  
I mean, I am topless and all.

In the past few days, however, I’ve seen two home tours on Apartment Therapy that have used my beloved colour combination of black, white and varying tones of grey along with a warm pallet of olive greens, mustard yellow and natural wood tones.  One thing that has stood out to me in both of these homes is the use of the colour red as an accent colour, specifically by means of a rug.  Oh yes, you guessed it correctly.  An Oriental/Persian style rug not unlike the one my mother had all those years ago.

Here’s the first house…

Try not to get distracted by that wonderful chest and the velvet settee…
Another angle of the same space.  The rug is a dead ringer for the one my mum had.

Despite being an undisputed classic, this is somewhat of a revelation to me.  I love the combination between red and olive green in my kitchen, I just hadn’t considered using red to anchor the colour schemes in the kitchen and dining room which carries a dark grey on it’s walls with touches of yellow and green.

Here’s the second home…

The rug takes centre stage with the soft grey, white and black.  
The mustard cushion adds another pop of colour.
How lovely does it look with the olive green and the more modern striped window seat?

A rug for my dining room was always on the cards but I assumed I’d go with something more modern and practical like those woven jute ones you see everywhere.  But having something like this could possibly take the room to a whole other level of eclectic sophistication that I’m after.

Have you had any decorating revelations lately? Do you think oriental rugs are the future?  Or do you think they should remain firmly in the past and we all need to just get over it already? Do you find it bizarre my brothers are nearly black and I’m still so impossibly white that I’m practically translucent despite my Latina roots? Have I finally lost it? Do tell in the comments…

Image credits:  First image my own.  All remaining images Apartment Therapy.  By the way, both are really lovely eclectic homes and you can see the full house tours here and here, respectively.


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